CENTRAL ALBERTA WOMEN'S OUTREACH SOCIETY

Registered Name: CENTRAL ALBERTA WOMEN'S OUTREACH SOCIETY

Business Number: 137445821RR0001

Safety for all during COVID-19

The safety of women, children, and seniors facing abuse is a top priority. We are working diligently to meet the challenge of meeting the safety needs of the women, children, and seniors who rely on the continued operations of our services. We are adapting our services to balance the needs of our community.Our staff are trained to help assess a families their danger levels and create safety plans. A safety plan is a proactive strategy that staff create with to minimize the risks for them and their children, even if they are still in contact, or even living, with their abusive partner. We know that in times of natural disasters, there can be an increase in demand for services as increased anxiety and external stressors accelerate and exacerbate domestic violence situations. Evidence from previous environmental disasters and pandemics suggest that domestic violence will increase during and following this health emergency. Survivors of violence are already more vulnerable to economic and health insecurity and may experience increased isolation and danger due to the current COVID-19 pandemic. Survivors may have specific needs around safety and health, and it is crucial to take those needs into consideration. When survivors are forced to stay in the home or in close proximity to their abuser more frequently, an abuser could use the quarantine as a tool to exert control over their victim. As many of us are isolating for public health directives, there are as many reasons to pay attention to the wellbeing of those in your community and offer to help. We can practice physical distance while staying socially connected. We know Canadians want to help each other.This may be a frightening and isolating time for survivors and their children. It is important to ensure that service providers have the tools they need to respond in ways that are safe and supportive for survivors of violence. Our response to this pandemic should include taking care of each other and reaching out to make sure that loved ones, friends, and colleagues have the care and support they need and to see if they feel safe at home   Cut off from friends and family, faced with the monotony of the interior of your home, mingled only with the prospect of job loss in a looming economic crisis as a pandemic threatens you and those you love. These uncertainties can cause and/or heighten anxiety and fear. For those among us who live alone, it will severely increase our isolation from others. In short, both Covid-19 and the recommended strategies to “flatten the curve” or slow the spread of the disease, increase the risk of suicide among those already most vulnerable and, for others, it creates a risk that was low or did not exist prior to the pandemic. Infectious disease outbreaks such as COVID-19, as well as other public health events, can cause emotional distress and anxiety. Feeling anxious, confused, overwhelmed or powerless is common during an infectious disease outbreak, especially in the face of a virus with which the general public may be unfamiliar. These feelings of distress and anxiety can occur even if you are not at high risk of getting sick. As many of us are isolating for public health directives, there are as many reasons to pay attention to the wellbeing of those in your community and offer to help. We can practice physical distance while staying socially connected. We know Canadians want to help each other.This may be a frightening and isolating time for survivors and their children. It is important to ensure that service providers have the tools they need to respond in ways that are safe and supportive for survivors of violence. Our response to this pandemic should include taking care of each other and reaching out to make sure that loved ones, friends, and colleagues have the care and support they need and to see if they feel safe at home   COVID 19 response services:• Our phone lines remain active for immediate response to those in our community• We are offering FREE single phone/video sessions with one of our therapists and mental health professionals• Providing safety for women and their children through Julietta’s Place the second stage shelter• Providing support for families to receive basic items of need where they are not able to leave their home• Providing support to victims of domestic violence while they receive medical attention through the Emergency Department of the hospital to ensure their safety.• Provide immediate accommodations where necessary for those who cannot return home due to safety and there is no other option in the community. The safety of women, children, and seniors facing abuse is a top priority. We are working diligently to meet the challenge of meeting the safety needs of the women, children, and seniors who rely on the continued operations of our services. We are adapting our services to balance the needs of our community.Our staff are trained to help assess a families their danger levels and create safety plans. A safety plan is a proactive strategy that staff create with to minimize the risks for them and their children, even if they are still in contact, or even living, with their abusive partner. We know that in times of natural disasters, there can be an increase in demand for services as increased anxiety and external stressors accelerate and exacerbate domestic violence situations. Evidence from previous environmental disasters and pandemics suggest that domestic violence will increase during and following this health emergency. Survivors of violence are already more vulnerable to economic and health insecurity and may experience increased isolation and danger due to the current COVID-19 pandemic. Survivors may have specific needs around safety and health, and it is crucial to take those needs into consideration. When survivors are forced to stay in the home or in close proximity to their abuser more frequently, an abuser could use the quarantine as a tool to exert control over their victim. As many of us are isolating for public health directives, there are as many reasons to pay attention to the wellbeing of those in your community and offer to help. We can practice physical distance while staying socially connected. We know Canadians want to help each other.• This may be a frightening and isolating time for survivors and their children. It is important to ensure that service providers have the tools they need to respond in ways that are safe and supportive for survivors of violence. Our response to this pandemic should include taking care of each other and reaching out to make sure that loved ones, friends, and colleagues have the care and support they need and to see if they feel safe at home   Cut off from friends and family, faced with the monotony of the interior of your home, mingled only with the prospect of job loss in a looming economic crisis as a pandemic threatens you and those you love. These uncertainties can cause and/or heighten anxiety and fear. For those among us who live alone, it will severely increase our isolation from others. In short, both Covid-19 and the recommended strategies to “flatten the curve” or slow the spread of the disease, increase the risk of suicide among those already most vulnerable and, for others, it creates a risk that was low or did not exist prior to the pandemic. Infectious disease outbreaks such as COVID-19, as well as other public health events, can cause emotional distress and anxiety. Feeling anxious, confused, overwhelmed or powerless is common during an infectious disease outbreak, especially in the face of a virus with which the general public may be unfamiliar. These feelings of distress and anxiety can occur even if you are not at high risk of getting sick.As many of us are isolating for public health directives, there are as many reasons to pay attention to the wellbeing of those in your community and offer to help. We can practice physical distance while staying socially connected. We know Canadians want to help each other.This may be a frightening and isolating time for survivors and their children. It is important to ensure that service providers have the tools they need to respond in ways that are safe and supportive for survivors of violence. Our response to this pandemic should include taking care of each other and reaching out to make sure that loved ones, friends, and colleagues have the care and support they need and to see if they feel safe at home   COVID 19 response services:• Our phone lines remain active for immediate response to those in our community• We are offering FREE single phone/video sessions with one of our therapists and mental health professionals• Providing safety for women and their children through Julietta’s Place the second stage shelter• Providing support for families to receive basic items of need where they are not able to leave their home• Providing support to victims of domestic violence while they receive medical attention through the Emergency Department of the hospital to ensure their safety.• Provide immediate accommodations where necessary for those who cannot return home due to safety and there is no other option in the community.