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Great Lengths: Swim for Plastic-Free Oceans

Oceana Canada

$8,679 raised of $15,000 goal
57.86% Complete
$0
$7,500
$15,000
0 minutes Remaining
Campaign Ends Nov. 22, 2019
  • Campaign

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT! THIS FUNDRAISER ENDED NOVEMBER 15, 2019.

Plastic pollution is a massive and growing threat to our oceans. An estimated eight million tonnes of plastic enter our oceans every year, roughly the equivalent of dumping a garbage truck full of plastic into the oceans every minute. As plastics continue to flood into our oceans, the list of marine species affected by plastic debris expands. Tens of thousands of individual marine organisms have been observed suffering from entanglement or ingestion of plastics—from zooplankton and fish, to sea turtles, marine mammals and seabirds. 

We must significantly reduce the use of single-use and disposable plastics at its source. Recycling alone is not enough. Oceana Canada is advocating for companies and governments to reduce the amount of plastic in the supply chain and find alternative ways to package and deliver products. To accomplish this, we need help from passionate Canadians who are eager to protect our oceans.

Whether you’re a novice or a professional swimmer, you can take action against ocean plastic pollution by joining Great Lengths: Swim for Plastic-Free Oceans, a peer-to-peer fundraiser to support Oceana Canada’s campaign to end single-use plastics. You will determine the distance you are committed to swim and your fundraising goal, and then recruit your friends, family, classmates and colleagues to support your commitment with a donation.

Will you pledge to swim five kilometres? Across the lake at your cottage? 200 laps of your backyard swimming pool? A 10 kilometre relay with your friends?

Thank you to everyone who participated and showed their passion by going to great lengths for a great cause! Your support will help us protect the ocean and marine life from harmful plastic pollution.